It’s funny, I used to live in a country that rained on average 300 days of the year, yet I’m letting the torrential downpour we’re experiencing at the moment put a damper on my Oscar fun this year. I’m  opting to stay dry and cozy at home with Daisy. This year it’s the weather that’s not pretty, but I can guarantee you there’s plenty of schmoozing going on now for Hollywood’s biggest event of the year…
Staying dry and cozy with Daisy Oscar weekend

Staying dry and cozy with Daisy Oscar weekend

… so I thought I’d re-run this post about the difference between socializing and networking. After all, I do have a long history as a party girl (that’s me third from the left), so I’m acutely aware of the difference.
Party girls

Party girls

Feb. 2011: My yoga instructor asked us to think about the last time we looked someone in the eye throughout an entire conversation, and really connected. He spoke of a friend who teaches a twelve week course in which one of the assignments is to eliminate all forms of communication that deceptively detach us from having meaningful relationships. Originally the assignment was no telephone, radio, or television for one week – today it covers computers, smart phones, iPods, iPads, Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, etc. as we become more and more disconnected from each other.

Remembering friends I can't make eye contact with anymore

Remembering friends I can’t make eye contact with anymore

I was engulfed in sadness as I reflected upon the luncheon I had just come from. I’m deliberately not mentioning names, because I do adore these people – they are friends I share a long history with, and they know through experience that I am far from perfect; but I do hope they see this post and think about what I am about to say. I say it, because they’ve each touched my heart, and I miss them dearly – even when they are sitting right next to me.
Back when we still made eye contact

Are you making eye contact?

Out of a table of nine of us, some came on time – others came late without an apology or apparently understanding that it’s disrespectful to others (including the poor waitress that nearly had a nervous breakdown just trying to keep up with the orders shouted at her randomly as a result). Some left early without a thought or thanks for the rest of us being left with their bill. I felt like I was on an acid trip as conversations were routinely interrupted, and most of my companions were incapable of finishing a sentence without incessantly checking their “smart” phones for some communication they obviously felt more important than our own. There had been precious little eye contact or any real human connection. Just a superficial void that rears it’s ugly head every year as the Oscars draw near.
Oscar time

Oscar time

I’m writing this right after accepting an invitation to one of “those parties”, so I’m no better than the next. I’m well versed at dressing up, turning on the public me, and schmoozing with an impenetrable wall around me too; but when I sit down to lunch with a small group of friends, some of whom I’ve not seen for years, I want social not networking. I’m not asking for a whole week or even a full day of eye contact and meaningful conversation – just one intimate lunch amongst friends where we turn off our cell phones, computers, and egos. Not because I’m trying to judge anyone… because you mean so much more than all that to me!
Social-izing is far more satisfying

Social-izing is far more satisfying

I’m curious, how many of you out there would be willing to give up modern technology in favor of reconnecting to the human experience? How long could you, or would you be willing to give it up for? A meal, a day, a weekend, or more?
PCA-VIDEO-HOLDER-v2-e1375054399726
I’m using this rainy day as my Personal Chef Approach cook date, so I have time to connect over a great home cooked meals. What exactly does that mean? In just a few hours I can have dinner ready, every night for the rest of the week (or longer). Watch the video above to see how it works, because “glamour doesn’t have to stop just because you put the apron on!”
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  • February 26, 2011
    6:45 am

    I'm willing! Let's do it!

    Reply
  • February 26, 2011
    7:38 pm

    I do think I let modern technology eat up too much of my time. I enjoy the ability to connect with others that I'm not physically close to, but it also creates a lot of excess "noise" and "clutter" in my life. My attention span seems much more scattered than it used to be. A technology/internet detox is probably in order, or at least a strict limitation on when and where I will use my phone or laptop.Kathy

    Reply
  • February 26, 2011
    7:42 pm

    I cannot agree with you more!! Sometimes I feel invisable at the tabel with members of my own family! We have a rule…no electronics of any kind at home with our kids. Thank you for posting such insightful thoughts!!Caryn M. Yorkville, IL

    Reply
  • February 26, 2011
    7:44 pm

    Oh man Kathy, you hit the nail on the head about our attention spans! I really need a techno detox. It's pretty hard to do during the week for many of us with business, but maybe we could all do one where we had no tech for a whole weekend, and the rest of the week only during business hours – otherwise computers, cell phones, etc. off! Shall we set a date to try it together?

    Reply
  • February 26, 2011
    8:10 pm

    The resistance I'm feeling at the idea of a weekend without technology means I really do need it. It feels a little terrifying, like giving up my security blanket.I'd been thinking just over the last few days that I'd like to "turn off" when I get home from work. I need to use my computer on the weekends for some work that I'm doing, but I don't need the internet.How about next weekend internet/social networking free?Kathy

    Reply
  • February 26, 2011
    8:48 pm

    Hi Jewels, you know its funny b/I had this conversation a couple months back with friends. I appreciate the new friends I have made via twitter and facebook etc (like you!) I often feel isolated and there are days that I only talk to my daughter in 3D as I like to say. I think its great that I am able to keep in touch with friends across the globe but it should NEVER replace human contact. In 2006 I eliminated tv from my house partly as a test to see if my daughter improved in school (she did) but now with the internet and ipods etc it is not much of a sacrifice. I think setting boundaries for ourselves on techno use is a great idea to break this trend of non-human interaction. So maybe on this weekend experiment we can go see a friend we haven't in a while or talk to someone new at a coffee shop or art exhibit? Even if you just acknowledge someone with a smile as you walk the dog or in the check out line at the grocery store it really can help! Anyway, just a thought :) Penelope

    Reply
  • February 26, 2011
    9:03 pm

    And so well put Penelope!I really worry about the younger generation that are growing up with all of this lacking the face to face social skills one needs for building meaningful relationships, and we are starting to forget the importance of human contact too. There are without doubt HUGE benefits to the cyber connection, lets just not confuse that for human connection. One makes the world a smaller place, but the other reminds us to feel compassion for others, and be a part of the human experience.

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    12:44 am

    We have a 'technology free' dinner table because it's anti-social to text during a conversation (really it's rude). Unfortunately the youngin's are terrible for texting & talking, I fear for the future. I'd be writing about a lunch like that too Jewels. Self importance gets the best of some people.Cupcakexo

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    10:04 am

    I think you all describe the situation perfectly. What is my kind of fight against it? Well, maybe is not much what I do, but from Mon-Fri my workmates and my housband are the only people I talk to. I feel isolated from my friends and family and try to arrange that through phone calls. But on weekends, well, that's another story: it is my time with family and friends,we always make arrangements to have luch or dinner with them, pay visitis and talk talk talk!!!

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    1:16 pm

    It's so true but people don't talk about it much, & I don't think this is a sustainable, natural way of living. We haven't even lived like this for long but if I announced I was cutting off my internet & cell phone service people would think I was out of my mind! When my daughter was born 4 years ago I would look at her tiny infant face & think 'she is probably wondering why we are staring at these screens all the time'. Now she four & is sitting next to me on her little ipod & she knows how to use it better than me. it makes me sad, the whole family is always connected to separate devices, not connecting to each other. & we have no idea what the repercussions of this technology will be for our kids & society.I'm a new follower here but loving this blog, Cheers to you J.! Best of luck with your gourmet venture :)

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    5:22 pm

    social yes not networking!Agree JAR…Rupert Henning Belfrage

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    6:04 pm

    Ok, sigh. It IS insidious indeed: the effect of working online which many of us do now as well as, ahem, accounting work online and then using twitter (so much more efficient than facebook) for news and keeping track of the blogs of our lives … a comment here and hello there.Arggh. I can't do it. But, sigh, no ipads at tea, I promise!!And, ahem, didn't the previous generation complain about TV and before that the radio?That dress and you are way too glam, by the way!!!!! Va va voom!!

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    6:08 pm

    Hey Ms. In New York – can't you turn it off occasionally? Anyway, you are not an offender – you look me in the eye when we have tea.I longggggggggggg to wear dresses like that again!

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    6:39 pm

    Hello Jewels,Think about it in this context: before smart phones, landlines, telegraph offices, and even letter writing, there was the well. It was a place where the women gathered to draw their supply for drinking, cooking, bathing, or washing clothes (more like beating them up against a rock with some lye soap). The well was also a font of information about town news, gossip, matchmaking, and the like. All we've done in today's society is substitute one watering hole for another. If we had lived in the 60s, we'd be upset because we wouldn't know someone was late coming to the restaurant. Now we're upset because we know they will be. I believe humans will always want the latest of technology to make life easier only to alter our lives to suit the next phase, and then blame it for our own faults.Erratication of these tools is not the answer. We'd complain about our personal carrier pigeons being too slow if that was the only method. We need to govern that as much as our caloric intake or time in front of the TV (which now includes smart phones and laptops). Just keep in mind that your friends are part of your family, and family members can irritate at times. But if a crisis arised where they needed advice or a sympathetic ear, then the cursed technology that puts up occasional walls will form a much needed window.

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    7:51 pm

    I currently work in the digital media field. I'm on a computer for a good part of my job. I have an iPhone, Facebook account, a blog and twitter account (which I always forget to use. With that said I find it terribly rude when people are checking their email in a business meeting! Further I go crazy when I’m talking to someone work or non work and their phone rings and they cut me off to answer it. Lucky for me most of my friends don’t do this. Oddly I have surrounded myself with those who turn off their TV when people are over at their home. Americans on average watch 34 hours a week of TV. I added up mine and came to 21 to 28 hours. It’s horrible when I start to complain I don’t have time to go to gym or take a class or pursue an art hobby. What a bad excuse. When at parties my phone stays in my purse for emergencies only. Personally unless there an emergency situation happening with family or a friend, there no reason to be whipping out the phone to text, tweet or take a call. Further I’m a stickler for manners. I mean how many people even think to thank a hostess after a party? Even if it’s going over to a friend’s house for a BBQ or to a restaurant and it’s laid back, the person hosting should be thanked. So in a long winded way my answer is yes. I can live without my phone, computer and or any other digital device for the amount of time it takes to have lunch, dinner and or tea with friends.

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    8:17 pm

    Oh,all riiight. I suppose I can live a couple days without reading something new from you. Although I do LOVE reading your blogs and posts! ;) Aesea Neassa

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    8:17 pm

    That is an inspired guest list at that dinner party! Wow!Pamela Mountain

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    8:18 pm

    es, Pamela – and three of them I will never have lunch with again, so I cherish the time I can spend with my living friends. Trust me, no one had their cell phones on that night.Aesea – I'm flattered, and I promise my posts will still be there waiting for you after you take a cyber break.

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    8:32 pm

    Biogistics I don't think you read this carefully, or I obviously touched a nerve in you – never once do I say that modern technology is not important, and of course it enhances our lives (we wouldn't all own it, if it doesn't). What I am warning here is – there is a correct time for everything, and when you are face to face with an old friend is NOT the time to be surfing the web. It is rude, and makes it impossible to connect on anything other than a superficial level. While technology helps us connect in many ways, it can and does disconnect us on a very necessary human level when used mindlessly and inappropriately.

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011
    10:03 pm

    I shut twitter off during my work day at meals.i'm firewalled at work to help. I try to shut my phone down when with my friends. Though I wil say that I did go on a date a couple months ago, with this guy that keep looking at his phone. it was off puting. The over usage of colonge could be kirbed but this was very rude

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    12:04 am

    I'm with you Julie Anne! The computer has taken over our lives and that is defintely not for the better. I find that no one phones to chat anymore. There are days that go by without the telephone ringing. I can count on one call each week, someone who calls me every Sunday at the same time to check in and see how I am. It makes me sad and I feel so isolated at times. Reading your posts opened a world for me, I got the nerve to actually comment way back. Now, I consider you one of my closest cyber friends. I tweet a lot trying to draw attention to my blog and art web site, that seems to work better than telling anyone about it. I watch very little television, the radio is on from the moment I wake up until I crawl back into bed at night. My biggest fear is that something serious could happen to me and if I was not able to push the "panic" button on my wrist, no one would be the wiser. No one really knows their neighbours anymore much less carries on a conversation with them. I'm not able to get out all the time, it depends on how I am feeling and how stable my body is in terms of driving the scooter. All that being said, I think it is time to cut back on the computer and pick up a book and read. Sit back and really listen to music. My cell phone is strictly for emergencies, not for general use. I don't have an I-pad, I-phone, texting ability or any of those new devices. My computer is pretty much my way of getting out and talking to people. I don't know what the answer is in my case. Hindsight is 20/20. I should have spend more time building relationships instead of working overtime. I'm not saying all this to get anyone feeling sorry for me, please don't. I'm being open and honest so that people don't make the same mistake that I did. You deserve a normal home life with family and friends. Don't take it for granted that your friends now will be your friends 10 years from now. You have to work on a friendship, take time to build up trust, and sadly so many of us don't do that.

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    2:22 am

    Your words make me want to offer you a gigantic all encompassing hug. No feeling is worse than the feeling of separation from loved ones when they are right there with you. Especially those you don't get to see much anymore.I'm very choosy when it comes to friends and would rather spend a couple of days a year with someone I adore than have someone I don't connect with on my doorstep every evening. My dearest friends are scattered far and wide on both sides of the Atlantic and I have things like Facebook to thank for letting me be a part of their lives everyday.I love technology for connecting me with the world in my periods of hibernation. It keeps me sane to have my friends there at the touch of a button while the real world demands and devours my time and my energy.You make me feel so lucky that when I do venture out with my true friends to fabulous places, we are guilty of ditching the stardust and the glitter early to retreat somewhere more homely to chatter and enjoy each other's company. We spend weeks or months getting excited about an event, all day getting ready. Then an hour or two within the hallowed doors of a private club in the presance of greatness and we're ready to bolt to the Hard Rock Cafe or the nearest cosy pub to let our hair down and chatter, put the world to rights and cry on each others shoulders. We're also guilty of ditching the hassle of gig afterparties for bands we love to go back to the hotel, strip off the make-up and chatter over cups of tea in our nighties. We're hopeless. We chase the buzz of life in the light and then as soon as we're there we'd rather just be settled somewhere comfy enjoying each others company instead….and those in my life who fritter away the joy of conversing over a meal by juggling their many cell phones are the ones I feel less and less like spending my time with. The chasm between us widens ever deeper and I find myself less inclined to bother making the effort to see them.I'm happy to disconnect from the internet and let the cell phone battery lay dead and uncharged in my handbag for days on end when I have my friends there with me. And I'm happy to spend a fortune on travel to attend an event just to spend the whole time there away from the action sat around a table in the bar because it's the only time I see that many of my friends all at once.Treasured time with those you love, just being yourself, is the biggest buzz of all. So many people loose sight of that.

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    2:59 am

    Ruthee, I hear what you're saying and I feel it so keenly. It's never too late to find good friends, or to realise that you already have them and just aren't calling upon them or letting them know that you need them. Even if you just need to hear their voice or to have a laugh with them over the telephone. If they don't call, sometimes you need to call them and let them know you crave the joy of the sound of their voice.I have always been a workaholic. I derive too much joy from striving for endless perfection and couldn't bear it if I wasn't thought to always put in 110%, 24/7.I worked myself into the ground a few years ago at a job I loved so much that it fed me what I thought was contentment. I did overtime, I filled every gap, I carried out every unattended task that came into my view and I carried everyone that was struggling as well as those who were not pulling their weight. I continued like this during a cancer scare, cancelling some of my hospital appointments to fill in for other people's illness and taking paperwork home with me when my medication was making me too ill to drive to work and back safely.In the midst of this I had a very stupid episode where I tried to multi task cleaning my house at speed on a rare afternoon off work. I simultaneously set my washing on fire in the kitchen, cut myself and bled everywhere and then passed out on the bathroom floor trying to ring for help. The really stupid thing was that the number I dialled as I was passing out was my own phone number. That is how singular I'd become. I was trying to ring *myself* for help.The astonishing thing was that when I typed out this episode on my blog I was flooded with messages from friends who loved me and would be there for me if I'd just asked them. They all thought it typical of me that I'd got myself in this situation and were laughing and crying simultaneously over the way I'd dialled my own number in my moment of need.A year later when I'd had the all clear and was still working 24/7 my mother was diagnosed with cancer and I had a nervous breakdown which finally severed me from the beloved job that was draining me of my own life. I'd never taken the time to deal with my own issues and when I found out how ill my darling mother was I finally crumbled under the belated weight of everything.Thankfully my mother and I are both now well and those trials have made me realise that I have many wonderful friends who would do anything for me… but I'd just never bothered to ask because I was always too busy trying to do everything for everybody all by myself. I'm still trying to get that idea through my thick head. I still struggle through single handed a lot of the time when I should let people help me. But at least realise now what I'm doing, and I don't think I'm in danger anymore of calling myself in an emergency. ;) Do reach out any way that you can, and make sure that the friends you already have realise how much you both treasure and need them.

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    5:03 am

    Interestingly…and sadly…I know how you feel. Reading this was like listening back on my own thoughts from days gone by.-Jean

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    2:22 pm

    I totally agree. It's so difficult once you get used to all the "stuff" to then just give it up. I have a 5 year old. When she was smaller she couldn't quite say the word computer. She said "competer" instead. I thought it was perfect. It certainly was competing for my attention. I work full time so my time with my daughter is precious. I always try to remember the "competer" when I have the urge to check e-mail/twitter/facebook.Hope we can all remember that sitting in front of a computer by yourself is NOT social! Cheryl Soler

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    5:59 pm

    Very well said, Jewels! ♥Sara Myron

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    6:05 pm

    People ARE addicted to technology. I swim 5 days per week and my instructor actually answers her phone and makes calls DURING CLASS!!! On Tuesday and Thursday when we are swimming laps she texts the entire time. I'm fed up with it and want to talk to her about it. Did you see the video of the gal at the mall that was texting and actually fell into the fountain? And people that are driving and texting (it's not yet illegal in TX) are worse than drunk drivers. NO message is more important than a human life. What has become of us?

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    7:58 pm

    Excellent blog entry. Thank you.Robbie Lorraine

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    10:16 pm

    My computer has "retired". It was getting a little old and after a huge virus struck it I decided that was that (well for a while at least). It has been a couple of months and I must say not having a computer to jump on during my spare time has been heaven. I have had more time doing things I totally enjoy. Like spending more time painting/sketching and those long walks I have been meaning to do for so long. Of course from time to time I have managed to get onto my husband's laptop just so I can see what it happing in the land of "jewels". Although I must admit it has not been so often as in the past. It is scary knowing how much we all depend on technology. Only last weekend I was at a 9th birthday and saw a little girl playing on her cell phone. What more can I say. Whatever happened to kids just being kids and playing with the simple things in life.Aussie Mum

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011
    11:04 pm

    PremierLudwig, you and I are so similar in many ways. My job was my life, I loved being in the office, it was busy beyond belief, but that was wonderful in my eyes. I didn't see myself getting ill until I started blacking out at my desk and I hid that as much as I could. That's how much my job meant to me. The people I worked with were ones I considered to be my best friends. One still keeps in touch with me and we meet for coffee usually once a month. I have a small group of "close" friends that I know I can always count on and they know that I will always be there for them. But, because my health causes problems with regards to what I can physically do, I don't like to bother friends when I need help. So,while my circle of friends is small, we are always there for each other. The people I worked with were friends at work, but not so much outside of the workplace. Life revolves around equipment like I-pads, computers, satellite television, texting. Like you, I would rather overlook the texting than not see someone that I love dearly. I never want to appear needy, consequently, I don't often initiate calls or emails saying we should get together or meet somewhere for coffee and a quick chat. I think in many cases my health issues have caused this separation, former friends don't know how to deal with my mobility issues and other health problems.I understand their discomfort. That was why I got more active in painting, blogging, tweeting. My cyber family, Julie Anne being included, mean so much to me because they do accept me without ever having seen me. That's pretty amazing, so the social network in this case has opened the doors for me to participate and be just one of the gang. But, at the same time, I see people putting technology ahead of real friendships. Some people just have to be connected at all times to their phone, computer, or are addicted to computer games, television and put these ahead of real socialization skills. I have to wonder how our young adults who are coming of age will handle relationships during their lifetime. Maybe part of upcoming curriculum changes will need to bring in a course on social interaction. I went to adult education about 12 years ago to learn computer skills, and part of the course was actually how we interacted during the course of the day, how to shake hands when meeting someone, how to carry on a conversation. So, this problem is not new, but is one that has maybe gotten out of control. Julie Anne has hit the nail on the head with this post. People do not make eye contact when talking, they find their little electronic devices of more importance than the person sitting right beside them. I'm not feeling sorry for myself, I apologize if my comments upset anyone or made anyone feel sorry for me. Please, don't feel sorry for me, but consider what I said and maybe reach out to a friend who has fallen out of their field of vision and set up a coffee/tea meet. I really do believe that we need to turn off technology on a regular basis and get to know each other. This doesn't mean that I value friendships made via the computer any less than the conventional ones. I treasure all my friendships and I hope the people I tweet, meet through blogs or other electronic ways know that I really do care. This is kind of like the decline in writing letters or sending greeting cards. I send cards frequently, often just to tell someone that something made me think of them and why. I make my own cards thinking of the recipient and personalizing the card so that they know that it was made just for them. I'm hoping that I can make someone feel special or give them a lift when I do this. Just maybe we need a refresher course called Friendship 101.

    Reply
  • March 1, 2011
    6:12 am

    Ruthee, your words don't sound needy at all or that you are asking people to feel sorry for you, they sound like a wise reality check that you're trying to share with us all.And you need to patent Friendship 101 and roll it out ASAP! I felt all through school that I could have done with some social training, but in hindsight, I wasn't the one that needed the training. I just needed trainign in how to deal with those who have bad social skills. So many important life skills and kindnesses have been thrown aside in the modern world and are non-existant in schools. I really think school life in many ways teaches us to be fake and to become insular with our emotions as a defence mechanism. Yes it protects us ready for the possible hardships of the outside world, but it's not doing us many favours relationship wise. My upbringing taught me that a good firm handshake is an important tool in life, but I rarely find when I offer my hand more than a limp lettuce of a response. Handshakes intimidate people nowadays, they were *supposed* to be a firm physical expression between two people of a trust. I've been told so many times by male colleagues that my firm yet gentle handshake upon meeting them intimidated and cnfused them. A firm handshake back from a man now has me in awe of him immediately just in it's rarity and puts me quite at a disadvantage, LOL!Despite being painfully shy it was also ingrained in me that it is polite to look someone in the eye and smile to them when talking, or just when briefly greeting them. Another rarity. No matter how shy or socially awquard I feel I am compelled to look someone who is speaking to me in the eye and offer them a smile (even if an apologetic "I'm not really up to this today" smile). Early into my nervous breakdown I went for much needed help and was marked as not needing it because I maintained eye contact, greeted with a smile, spoke cohernatly and was well dressed and well groomed. The fact all of this is ingrained into me was irrelevant, and the fact I couldn't leave the house without hours of grooming to make myself feel worthy and brave meant nothing. All because this is no longer normal behaviour in our world.But no matter what, I refuse to change. I am sorry if it freaks people out when I smile at them (on brave days) in the street. It's just my upbringing. I will not be dragged down to their level, I will bring them up to mine. And it brightens my day when I smile at someone at the checkout in a shop and their eyes sparkle in thanks that someone is actually bothering to pay them attention in a day filled with blank faces. Anyone reding this who doesn't smile and make eye contact at a checkout, try it. It brightens everyone's day so much that it's astonishing.And Ruthee, please try and educate anyone you can about your motibility issues. Their behaviour comes from the discomfort and fear of not knowing how to deal with you, which so so sad.The more people who share their thoughts, feelings, needs and preferences the easier it makes it for everyone. Someone with an extreme disability who kindly and honestly advises those around them how they can behave and help has less of a barrier than those with mild issues who acts as though there is no difference. People are so afraid of doing things wrong and offending people. It such a weight off their shoulders if someone comes straight out with "if I need help may I ask you?" followed by an explanation of what's easy for them to do and what's difficult.We can but hope that once your situation becomes better understood by your friends that they will find it normal and forget there is any difference at all.(and I promise to shut up for a bit now Jewels, sorry, LOL!)

    Reply
  • March 1, 2011
    7:29 pm

    Another thing about texting is that you can take a text the wrong way by not knowing what tone they meant it in. My husband and I just got into a fight(haha about seeing Duran Duran in Chicago)because I thought he was being sarcastic in a text and he wasn't. I agree we need to start talking again.Regina Goduto-Hershberger

    Reply
  • March 1, 2011
    7:29 pm

    I saw a really funny email recently about auto-correct faux pas on cell phones.

    Reply
  • March 1, 2011
    7:31 pm

    Really? And was that when I wore panty hose and gloves? OxDenise Vivaldo

    Reply
  • March 1, 2011
    7:31 pm

    Actually, I believe this picture is pre panty hose too Denise!

    Reply
  • March 1, 2011
    8:10 pm

    Oh my phone does that all the time. It's actually quite annoying and I've sent some ridiculous text's before because of it.Regina Goduto-Hershberger

    Reply
  • March 2, 2011
    4:02 am

    And life was a lot simpler!!!Alexander Leon

    Reply
  • March 23, 2014
    7:22 am

    At Oscars all the actors are looking brilliant. Their styles are really amazing..
    80sfashion.org

    Reply

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