I had lunch with my girlfriend, #1 New York Times best-selling author Marianne Williamson last Sunday, and persuaded her to give me an advance copy of her new book, A COURSE IN WEIGHT LOSS. The book is due to be released this Tuesday, but you can pre-order your copy here. The book was inspired by and dedicated to her friend, Oprah Winfrey, but it is truly a gift to all of us.


We’ve barely begun to indulge our sweet tooth with Halloween candy, and that generally spirals into a prolonged period of over-eating for most of us throughout the rest of the holiday season. On average, people gain from 2-5 pounds this time of year, then punish themselves for their gluttony with New Years resolutions (most of which eventually fail). The problem is that process subliminally tells us food is bad, and our plumper selves are unacceptable or unlovable.
Halloween

This is not another diet book. Obviously healthy eating choices and keeping active both play an important role in the big picture, but Marianne focuses on the tools to heal our “not-thin” souls, in the belief that your natural healthy weight will follow, and stay that way. A kinder, more loving way to heal ourselves from addictive or compulsive eating habits for good.

“Weight that disappears from your body but not from your soul is simply recycling outward for a while, but is almost certain to return. It’s self-defeating, therefore, to struggle to drop excess weight unless you are also willing to drop the thought-forms that initially produced it and now hold it in place.” – Marianne Williamson
Tatjana and Julie Anne Rhodes

I want to invite all of you to join me in working through these lessons together over the next few months. What better time to embark, than on the most food obsessed time of year charged with stress and difficult emotions for many? Marianne will be checking in periodically to answer any questions we may have along the way, and there will be a drawing for a personally signed copy of the book. To be eligible, be sure you “follow” Jewels from The Roving Stove, and participate in the comments section at the end of these posts. After all, what have we got to lose other than the excess weight we’ve been trying to get rid of for years?

Out on the town with Marianne last year

The first “What Have You Got to Lose?” post won’t appear until November 16th, so you’ll have time to get a copy of the book, and start working through the first few lessons. In the meantime, believing in miracles can be difficult at times, so lets think about the miracles (little and big) that have already changed our lives. I’m sharing a few of my experiences. Click on comments to view mine, and tell us what miracles you want to share?
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  • November 1, 2010
    12:27 am

    You can count me in! Dawn

  • November 1, 2010
    1:25 am

    By choice, I did not grow up with a strong spiritual foundation. Life on my own terms brought me to my knees in 1997, and I was forced to at least entertain the idea there may be a power greater than myself. I surrendered, the serenity prayer became my mantra, and miracles started happening instantaneously. I dared to grieve loss and I didn't drown in my own tears, the connection with my daughter (I feared I would lose) grew stronger, I found a way to earn a living doing something I love, and that is just the tip of the iceberg. Miracles really do happen.

  • November 1, 2010
    1:52 am

    I will be joining in this conversation as someone who has had massive weight issues my entire life. Having worked in the fashion industry behind the camera and wishing I could be more like what was in front of it. Now I have a larger scope on what constitutes beauty I feel ready to let myself finally be free…Laura Savidge

  • November 1, 2010
    1:56 am

    Me too Laura!

  • November 1, 2010
    3:21 am

    I've been battling weight since my 1st pregnancy. She's 22 now. I've lost & gained several times, and am back on the downward side of the slope again, thank God. I'm turning 50 this December, and I've decided I'm not going to get to 60 with health issues. Heart disease, arthritis and cancer run in my family, and I have too many things I want to do to let my health get away from me while I can still do something about it.I'm looking forward to this!

  • November 1, 2010
    5:36 am

    You are an inspiration Jewels !

  • November 1, 2010
    8:10 am

    Do you think calotren can be helpful for fat-loss. I got some recomendations from my friends to use it. However I am continuing my regular exercises and taking a balanced diet regularly. But I am going to use calotren for a quick result. Got a lots of positive reviews and it has no sideeffects too. So no problem to try it.

  • November 1, 2010
    3:35 pm

    I went through a divorce 4 years ago (as a lesbian, some people like to say that it wasn't a "real" divorce but I am here to tell you that it is as expensive, financially and emotionally, as any "real" divorce!) I honestly wasn't sure I would make it through that time in my life. I was spent in every way imaginable! I used food to help ease all of my pain and as a result gained a considerable amount of weight. It's always so "nice" to bump into one of my ex's friends and have their first reaction, upon seeing me, go something like this: "Ohhh hi so nice to SEE you(while their eyes travel up and down me – as in OMG look at her!). I have now picked myself up and I am in the process of "dusting" myself off. I am beyond ready to both shed all of this extra weight and reconnect to some semblance of spirituality. I have never been known to do things the conventional way! Anyway, that is what I meant by "count me in".Dawn

  • November 1, 2010
    4:02 pm

    I've never heard of calotren, and I am not a fan of diet supplements for weight loss. They are usually bogus, and sometimes dangerous. They are not regulated by the FDA, so they are not tested for safety stringently, or indeed that they deliver what they claim. How do you know there are no side effects? I would also make sure you run the ingredients by your own doctor before taking any supplement to ensure it will not react badly with anything you are already taking or prescribed.

  • November 1, 2010
    4:14 pm

    I will be following this discussion and giving it a try. My weight has been troublesome for me for most of my life, up and down and it's such an emotionally loaded issue now that it's hard for me to think I will ever be successful at accepting myself or dealing with it in a constructive way. Even just writing this comment, I'm crying. I'm not sure what, if anything, is out there that will help me. My brain feels totally broken regarding this issue.

  • November 1, 2010
    4:25 pm

    You are definitely not alone Semibold. I'm taking this journey along with you, because I suspect it is the missing link to our healthy weight success. I know I am going to work through every lesson in the book with an open heart and diligence.

  • November 1, 2010
    4:25 pm

    Count me in. Maybe this will help to keep me on track with a group effort. Thanks Julie Anne!

  • November 1, 2010
    4:31 pm

    I'm sharing this w/ my 15 yr old, her idea of trying to lose weight is not eating and won't listen to me telling her she is gonna damage her body, etc.Carly Guerrero

  • November 1, 2010
    4:33 pm

    Well I am certainly going to give this a go, I'll be in LA from 12th November to the 18th (holiday yay!!) so I am hoping I can get a copy of the book out there (where can I get it from??).At the moment I am a UK size 18 and that is only because I lost weight after a bout of that swine flu. I do have issues though. An amount of my hang ups are from being "fat Amanda" when I was at school. When I hit 16, my friends (and let me stress, I eventually woke up and smelt the coffee and they are no longer my friends) would often tell me that "large girls don't wear that kind of stuff – so I was always the girl at the parties with the dress that looked like the tent!!! Large girls don't get the blokes, and large girls…..well they are not loveable. I often had "oh Amanda is lovely but I wouldn't be seen out with her as she's fat and looking back I wasn't actually that big). I still flinch now and I know I should't really dwell but it was ingrained into me. I just need to find ways of losing and keeping it all off so I am going to really take part…. and I must write down the name of this book and put it with my holiday essentials and purchase it!

  • November 1, 2010
    4:49 pm

    I've struggled with bulimia, weight and self-image issues as a dancer and like any addiction will always have those demons when it comes to food. Though I'm in a healthier place in my life when it comes to my eating disorder, I still struggle with my weight and healthy eating. Count me in!!!

  • November 1, 2010
    4:51 pm

    I share so many of the same feelings and experiences about my weight. I really do believe our "not thin" selves need healing, and our relationship with food to be a healthy one before lasting weight loss can be sustained. The logic of the book makes such perfect sense to me, and there is so much more power in collective thinking – which is why I thought it would be great to work through it together. What is truly amazing is, as I start this journey miracles are popping up in all areas of my life, not just to do with my weight.

  • November 1, 2010
    5:01 pm

    I suppose I've come to terms with my weight. I eat well, I exercise every day and yet I'm still a big girl (size 16-18). All of the women in my family are also the same. One teaches skiing in the winter and does bike race in the summer and still looks like me. It's only society that tells me I'm fat and unfit. When I look in the mirror I don't see fat or unfit. My blood pressure is excellent and health is excellent apart from having asthma that I've had nearly all my life. This includes taking unavoidable steroids. I intend to read this book and see if it can help me. I already feel good about myself, so why am I still fat? I have a normal relationship with food so that isn't my problem. I did go on a meal replacement diet 4 years ago. It worked, but it was terrible. I missed eating. The physical activity of not eating is what made me crazy. A month after a stopped the diet, I was back at the same weight where I started. Not a pound more. Normally people who diet and put weight back on put more on then when they started. So how do you decide or know what's actually right for you? I always say I'm a 6 ft. girl trapped in a 5'3" body. I have big hands and feet and I have hips! LOL! ~April

  • November 1, 2010
    5:05 pm

    The release date for this book in the UK is 6th December. So, when I get my copy, I'll catch up. :)

  • November 1, 2010
    5:40 pm

    I will be following this but not so much for myself but for my friend. I am 43 years old and one of those women that other women "hate": I have the metabolism that lets me eat what I want and how much I want but never really gains weight. However I am having a hysterectomy tomorrow so I will be laid up for several weeks doing nothing but sitting around. I am a huge fan of your healthier eating posts, though!I'm going to send this to my friend who is struggling with her weight and to her, it's a big issue. She beats herself up over it. Maybe I don't completely understand as I'm a "thin" person that never had a weight problem, but I do know she's going about losing weight the wrong way. I am in her corner and trying to help her as much as I can. Thank you for the ever wonderful posts, Jewels!

  • November 1, 2010
    6:06 pm

    In response to April…I wish you luck with your hysterectomy. I had a radical(full) hysterectomy when I was 30. I know you don't have any weight to lose, but I will tell you it really has an affect on your body's metabolism. It has been more difficult for me to lose weight since the surgery. I know it's not the only factor that keeps weight on me but it certainly doesn't help.

  • November 1, 2010
    6:17 pm

    I'm in. I've struggled with weight issues after each of my pregancies. I managed to lose the 60 pounds I gained after my first, but despite being healthier and gaining less weight during my second, seven years later, I can't lose it. Three months ago, for various reasons, I finally decided that the starts and stops were enough and did research into controlling depression and anxiety through my diet. The amount of information I learned blew my mind – I thought that, as a lifetime Weight Watchers member, I was eating as healthy as could be. WRONG! Three months later, a lot of refined sugar and out the window, I'm finally losing. I'd love to follow along and tap into the spiritual side I seem to have gotten disconnected from.

  • November 1, 2010
    7:02 pm

    I ordered on Amazon when I heard it was coming out. I am pleasantly surprised you are doing this.Melinda McCoy LaBarge

  • November 1, 2010
    7:31 pm

    Well I am gonna sound like a broken record it seems but yes me too, been battling with my weight since I was probably 10 years old. I just turned 40 and it constantly plagues my mind. A big part of success though usually comes when you have a good support so I would love to join in. Often I stop/fail with getting in shape and losing weight b/I feel isolated and alone.I don't think I can handle the depression of another failure. I really want to do this though Jewels! My daughter's own health issues(type 1 diabetes) make me want to be as healthy for her as well as for me. I see Marianne is going to sign her book in Santa Monica in November. Maybe we can all meet up for that! Penelope

  • November 1, 2010
    9:09 pm

    I'm on board too Jewels. Pre-ordered the book. I posted a couple comments on your blog too :)Penelope Worley

  • November 1, 2010
    9:23 pm

    I've fought with my weight all my life. One of my memories goes back to when I was 12 yrs old. I was in bed and I could hear my sister & step mother cackling about how fat I was and on and on. I said nothing when I got up. In later years, after I had lost a lot of weight (over 100 lb.) my sister-in-law & step mother started a rumour that I was bulimic. I wasn't and didn't bother to debate the issue with them. My life shattered into a million pieces after this when my father died. My mother had died years ago when I was 7. I felt so alone. Wisely, I had nothing further to do with the family and stayed in touch with only my oldest sister. My weight ballooned up to 275, I wore a size 24, 4X or whatever the biggest size was that I could stuff myself into. Then it happened, my health hit the skids, arthritis developed in pretty much every joint along with other medical problems. I kept working and was losing weight without actively dieting. Eventually, my doctor pulled my from work due to my health problems and the weight loss continued. I now weigh 128.6 as of this morning. I'm only 5' tall, so while I'm still overweight, it's not as serious as it was. Maybe this book will help me find the piece of mind I'm looking for so badly. I need to believe that there is something better out in the universe for me. But, I know I have to actively seek it out. Count me in! I'll order a copy through an online service. Thank you for caring enough to bring this to the blog for discussion. There are so many of us with food issues and I suspect we could all write a chapter for the book.

  • November 2, 2010
    3:58 am

    I feel for ya Ruthee! And you are already an inspiration! I am only 5'3 and need to lose about 60lbs. Been up and down since I was a kid with my weight. I'm hoping going thru this will end the battle! Penelope

  • November 2, 2010
    4:43 am

    "Weight that disappears from your body but not from your soul is simply recycling outward for a while, but is almost certain to return." As someone who has had weight issues since my teens that quote really resonated with me. Please count me in! No better environment than a group of women inspiring and encouraging each other for positive change.Thank you for doing this Julie Anne!

  • November 2, 2010
    10:21 am

    Julie Anne, I am so proud of you. I've been checking in here with you(almost)from the beginning. It was no small miracle; I can hear another kismet-connection, my therapist,"There's a lot of transference going on here." Perhaps.Thank you for that. This lady is on a mission, and I am heartened by your journey. Since your dramatic,extravagant,& luminous appearance on my radar-personal mythology-as a 14yr old; you've embodied many archetypes. I am inspired by you, always have been. It's so cool, you're authentic! I think you are one of the world's most beautiful women, inside & out. Let's add courageous, unique, and an Earth mother.So stoked you're on the light path too.P.S. Your daughter strikes me as a deeply creative and very talented artist. It'll be cool to experience her art one day. I know I'm gushing. What else, already?I find, more & more, everday in everyway, that we must express our truth. Shine on, Jewels!

  • November 2, 2010
    4:42 pm

    I am so grateful you are doing this, Julie Anne, I am sincerely at my wits end with my weight. I grew up very tall and thin, although I thought I was "fat" many times throughout my life when looking back I only WISH I could be that "fat" again. Once I had my children, I gained weight and have gone up and down, but never back down to a healthy weight. When I look in the mirror I don't see myself as I am now, I see the person I used to be and get frustrated. I also see the scale continuing to creep up and my clothes getting tighter. My children are young, I want to have the energy to keep up with them and I want so much to be around for a long long time for them. I have tried every single diet and exercise plan out there, only to lose a little bit of weight and then gain more back. I have been praying for a miracle to come along to help me gain control and not gain anymore weight.Andrea Schlegel-Wallace

  • November 2, 2010
    4:54 pm

    I already feel better knowing I am not alone in my feelings (it's no secret my weight has fluctuated dramatically over the years and now seems to be consistently creeping up with age). I can stay out of savory food, but when I bake for clients – it turns into "one for them, and one for me" – I have to double the batches! I will say, I got a head start on the book, and I baked cupcakes this weekend with a friend and her daughter, and I only ate ONE! The obsession of never getting enough was lifted. Can't wait to see where this takes us all once we pool our thoughts and experiences along the way together.

  • November 2, 2010
    7:17 pm

    Hi Jewels…I did embark recently on a weight-loss journey but I need all the support and help I can get. Count me in!!

  • November 2, 2010
    7:21 pm

    Also, I wanted to add that I posted to your FB page that I joined Sparkpeople to try to motivate myself to lose weight, but I didn't really specify why.Reading through these comments makes me feel confident enough to open up about it, so I just want to put it out there that eating disorders run rampant in my family.My mother died when I was 7 due to complications from anorexia. My aunt (my mother's youngest sister) has struggled with anorexia for most of her teen/adult life.I am a binge/compulsive/emotional eater. So I am looking for a direction that points me within and help me fix the inside so I can fix the outside.Thank you for the opportunity, Jewels! Very inspirational!

  • November 2, 2010
    11:26 pm

    Shigatsuhana – three thoughts came to mind. 1). maybe you are at your healthy weight already – sounds to me like you are very healthy, so try not to let society mandate differently (easier said than done), 2). I was on high doses of steroids for years, and gained 50lbs. from being on them. It took years to shift any of that weight, and much of it is still there – so that could be part of your dilemna, and 3). None of us can lose anything (other than the cost of the book) from giving this a go, and we are likely to find all sorts of miracles happen. To me, it is well worth the cost, and I'm thrilled you want to join in too.Eldwenne – I think this book is as much for the anorexic or bulemic, as it is for the compulsive over-eater or food addict since it is really all about letting go of whatever fears feed our weight problems, and developing a healthy relationship with food. The food is not our enemy, and WE are not the problem – our fears are. You suffered a terrible loss at such a young age, so be gentle with yourself and take your time, but I do think this book might really help you. Love is what takes the place of fear, so sending everyone lots of cyber love!

  • November 3, 2010
    9:29 am

    Oh Jules, thank you so much for this! I love, love, love Marianne W, have had the pleasure of interviewing her, and am lining up another to coincide with the new book. Would so love to see you soon sweetheart. Am planning stateside early next year. Much love Tracey H X

  • November 3, 2010
    12:04 pm

    Julie Anne,Last autumn,I found myself measuring my worth on a scale, and coming up very short.I was a mere 30 pounds away from a whopping, 300 llbs-ouch! 50 melancholy pounds melted, thus far.How did I manage to do that? I knew you'd ask. I was grieving an unmendable fauktline in a love that I wanted to save so badly. And, riddled with a few immune system disoders. Somehow,I felt overly responsible for the break-up of my family. Abyssmal feelings of failure & unworthiness ignited a life-long complicated relationship with love, comfort & food. Slowly, I dared to love myself depite being buried in a fleshy disguise. I began to feel genuine compassion for myself-for the first time.It was sad, meaningful and necessary. It was now construction time again.I am frequently able to accomplish much in the name of a loved one-like all women. It is an honor to nurture others, yes, just as long I remember to be myself. Wait. Who's that? Who am I again?I then grappled with how to finally view that heart of mine, not as tyranical, yet as wanting only to delight in my birthright.` I'd been so generous to others, and so unrelentingly stingy to myself. Why this felt like a virtue,was a lonesome mystery to me,but not anymore. It is sobbing in public,and an airing of some type of secretive rite of passage; I see, here, how we've quietly and stoicly endured, and worse; we have graded each other. We of the "fairer" sex. My motivation to constantly criticize myself is finally spent. Now I write for clarity's sake, to hopefully spare others, because it feels strangely heady to admit to all of this. And the writing brings me a long awaited purpose. There is no possible way to maintain any veneer of togetherness, if my interior life isn't buzzing with simple self-approval. Not continual self-evisceration.Here we gatherin solidarity,because after checking back in, and reading so many brave posts,it's the correct time & place in which to share this sorrow. It wouldn't be honest not to do so,after your pioneering precedence. Especially since you've provided all of us an ideal platform; This is unreal: Marianne Williamson, and Julie Anne Rhodes. Honestly, the former is an amazing teacher and a model of what is possible. The latter is also a kindly fascinating & glowing star and she models love & artistic panache and financial savvy.A dreamteam, if you will, because both are :two georgous, successful& independent women declaring humanity.Two of my all-time faves combining strengths. (I adore the manner in which you've described it,Jewels,pooling.)Pools of hope. I embrace this invitation with a strong wish to see this platform bloom with women who feel important, vital & unique, through the weaving of pure lace-like emotion we women are so expert in.(Disclosure:2nd online post, ever.)WE WILL STOP this madness.

  • November 3, 2010
    12:43 pm

    Jewels-I believe I have an undiagnosed case of M.S. I have already been declared "handicapped" by a severe case of late stage Endometriosis. I live with my senior citizen-aged parents, don't drive currently, and was fairly isolated. Recently I joined an internet dating site, just to get into the great web of life.This experience of sharing such intimacies, has been a miracle. Thank you for the opportunity to share of myself. Next time,I will divest myself of the no longer suitable moniker of anonymous. You rock. We rock. :)

  • November 3, 2010
    4:05 pm

    WE rock! Have any of you started reading the book yet? It's all I want to do, but I have to keep my eye on the ball with a television program I'm working on this week, so little bits at a time.

  • November 3, 2010
    4:33 pm

    Hi Jules– MW is a good fried of mine too. Can't wait to get her book. Xx rb

  • November 3, 2010
    4:34 pm

    The book rocks Richard – just had lunch with all the girls to celebrate today. She is on top of her game.

  • November 3, 2010
    4:34 pm

    If you don't mind, I'll skip right now! TxTim Willis

  • November 3, 2010
    4:35 pm

    You have a good excuse my lovely! Get well quick, and I am thinking of you often.

  • November 3, 2010
    4:37 pm

    You don't need to lose any!Isabel Ortiz Bernad

  • November 3, 2010
    4:38 pm

    Thanks Isabel, but it is much more than just losing weight – it is a spiritual cleanse.

  • November 3, 2010
    4:38 pm

    Then I probably need both! :)Isabel Ortiz Bernad

  • November 3, 2010
    4:39 pm

    I'm joining in……whilst I could do with losing a few more little pounds a spiritual cleanse would be beneficial as wellAmanda Lake

  • November 3, 2010
    9:18 pm

    Wow, Jewels… Something you said above (in your comment about the cupcakes) really rang true with me. You said, "The obsession of never getting enough was lifted." That is really the place where I'm aiming to get to. I always seem to feel like MORE = BETTER, whether it be with food, alcohol, money, shoes, etc… I want to be able to be content with having just ONE cupcake. I think it's really cool you brought up this topic. And I think it's super-duper cool that so many people are joining in & sharing their stories. :-)I just ordered the book off Amazon. I really look forward to going through this spiritual cleanse with so many amazing women from your site! xoxoxLisa

  • November 3, 2010
    10:55 pm

    I've put the book on hold at the library (can't really afford to buy a new book right now). They have 22 copies of it and EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM is out. So, I will catch up when I a copy of the book comes in.that never having enough thing rings true with me, too. Although, I have been shifting with it over this year. I'm realizing it's not about food or what I weigh or any of that, it's about how I feel about myself.When I let go of the negative self-talk and the feelings it generates, I like my body and I love eating healthy. It's when I get caught up in feeling bad and down and crappy that I live on junk food. Looking forward to hearing what Ms. Williamson has to say on the subject!Savannah

  • November 4, 2010
    1:27 am

    I too am on board as soon as my 3rd daughter decides to be born (she is due on Tues!)So I may be a bit behind the rest of you!!!Colleen from Australia x

  • November 4, 2010
    11:31 pm

    I have picked up my copy of A Course in Weight Loss and have begun reading it. I have chills just reading the introduction. Marianne's words ring so true to me.Dawn Lassen

  • November 10, 2010
    6:11 pm

    I have been slightly over weight my whole life. I have been on every diet and tried every pill to lose. Oddly enough in the past two years I have used good old exercise and portion control and have lost 30 pounds and am at my ideal weight. I will still be using Marianne's book to keep my weight off and I am hoping to use it to stop smoking. I have read all her books and find them very helpful and inspirational. This one I am sure will be no different. Thank you for your blog, it's always helpful to have others to help with struggles

  • November 13, 2010
    10:38 pm

    Thank you for starting this discussion, Julie Anne. I'm working on the lessons in the book and am really looking forward to having other people to share this process with. Even having worked the 12 Steps for many years, Marianne's questions bring up new stuff for me. Sometimes I wonder, how can there be so much to turn over to God, even now, after so many years of turning things over?

  • November 14, 2010
    6:20 am

    I am soooooooo glad you said that! I couldn't believe how much spiritual house cleaning I still have left to do after 12 years of working a program. Learning tons about what makes me tick that I never realized before.

  • November 22, 2010
    9:55 pm

    I have happened upon "What Have You Got To Lose" at the most important time in my life….when I am looking for the answers to why I have failed in the past at weight reduction. May I find what I do not know, here

  • December 9, 2010
    7:22 pm

    I have often heard the term addiction used quite loosely. If someone really likes something and it brings them pleasure, they say they are addicted to it. On the flip side, I have seen it defined as a compulsive need for a habit forming substance characterized by well defined symptoms upon withdrawal. The dictionary even uses heroin, nicotine and alcohol as examples. Deep down, I have always known this was beyond my control and that nothing ever worked because I had not yet surrendered it to God. I toggled helplessly between truth and lies because I had not yet reached that place of total acceptance. I could reason that this was not an addiction. I get no pleasure out of what I do and only a minor headache when I remove the sugar. My behavior is extremely self destructive and it causes me great physical and emotional pain. I don't even like the words "comfort food" because I get no comfort out of the foods I eat. My body is begging me for love and healthy food. I spent years trying to rationalize my behavior and deny the fact that it was something beyond my control.There was a part of me that loved the fact that I could never quite relate to the way they defined addiction. My fear relied on this misunderstanding. Listen to the deceptive voice of my ego speaking, "This is not an addiction. It does not fit any definition I have seen or heard. You are not an addict. This is food for goodness sake. Don't give up!! Don't surrender!! You can do it!!! You can control this!! We just haven't found the right thing yet. We just need a little more will power….a little more self discipline. A few more modifications to our approach and it will be perfect." My ego was relentless and it showered me with unfullfilled promises. And then, in the midst of my relapses (and there were many), the voice of truth would speak. It didn't say much. It doesn't have to. "Love is the answer. Let it go. Surrender. Trust." But the ego doesn't give up that easy.When I read Marianne's definition of addiction, it struck me like a bolt of lightning. I am an "ADDICT". There is no denying it. Goodbye EGO!!! This made sense to me now. She gets it. It's not about the object of the addiction. It's the lack of control. The constant battle between the subconscious forces and the conscious mind. But none of this mattered to me at that moment. I am an "ADDICT" and I was peacefully in total acceptance of this. At that moment, I finally understood and believed that in truly accepting this I had toggled back to that place of truth where I know that there is a power greater than fear….greater than my addiction.

  • January 14, 2011
    9:02 am

    I love this post. such a great blog.

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